Tag Archives: False Claims

What’s Past is Prologue: How The FCA’s Eventful Year in 2016 Will Affect Government Contractors

2016 was a big year for the False Claims Act (FCA).  Total government recoveries were up; total new matters filed were up; and total new government-led FCA matters were up.  The Supreme Court issued multiple decisions relating to the FCA, including one—Universal Health Services, Inc. v. U.S. ex rel. Escobar, 136 S. Ct. 1989 (2016)—which … Continue Reading

Threats and Vulnerabilities – What Every Contractor Should Know About The SBA’s New “Presumed Loss” and “Deemed Certification” Rules

By David Gallacher Nearly three years ago, on September 27, 2010, the President signed into law the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 (“Jobs Act”), which directed the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) to implement a variety of small business size and integrity requirements. As noted in our prior blog posting discussing many of these requirements, … Continue Reading

An FCA Kerfuffle: First Circuit Reaffirms the Intent of the “First to File” Rule and Deepens Circuit Split

The First Circuit has added its say on the meaning of the False Claims Act’s “first to file” rule (31 U.S.C. § 3730(b)(5)) by holding that a first-filed complaint will preclude a later-filed suit, even when the first complaint is found insufficient under Rule 9(b) particularity requirements. See United States ex rel. Heineman-Guta v. Guidant … Continue Reading

Common Sense Prevails Once Again: District Court FCA Ruling Serves As Reminder That Whistleblowers Need to Prove Recklessness Too

By Christopher Loveland and Jonathan Aronie  While multi-million dollar False Claims Act (FCA) settlements paid by Government contractors get the lion’s share of the press, those with an attentive eye will have noticed a recent steady stream of more “contractor friendly” FCA decisions flying just under the national press’s radar. These cases, all arising in … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit: FERA False Claims Act Amendment Applies Retroactively to Cases Pending as of June 7, 2008

By John Hynes On November 2, 2012, the Sixth Circuit held that a 2009 amendment Congress made to the liability provisions of the False Claims Act ("FCA") applies retroactively to civil FCA cases pending as of June 7, 2008. U.S. ex rel. Sanders v. Allison Engine Co., Nos. 10-3818/10-3821, at *17-20 (6th Cir. Nov. 2, … Continue Reading

Predicating False Claims Act Liability On False Cost Estimates May Impact Contractors’ Willingness to Take On Projects Involving Next Generation Technologies

By Joseph Barton In 1995, the U.S. Air Force awarded Lockheed Martin the RSA II Contract (the “Contract”) for the provision of software and hardware used to support space launch operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base and Cape Kennedy. Importantly, the Contract is a cost-reimbursement type contract whereby a contractor is paid for the allowable … Continue Reading

Another U.S. District Court Follows The Lead Of The D.C. Circuit In Addressing The “First-To-File Bar” Circuit Split And Pushes Back Against An Opportunistic Relator

By Christopher Loveland and Jonathan Aronie While the False Claims Act (“FCA”) generally is understood to be a “whistleblower” statute, it has been a tool of choice in recent years for opportunistic qui tam relators who lack any inside information regarding the very companies they sue. Not surprisingly, this lack of inside information has resulted … Continue Reading

The Supreme Court To Decide Whether FOIA Responses Trigger The False Claims Act’s Public Disclosure Bar

By Robert M. P. Hurwitz The Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in a case testing the scope of the False Claims Act’s public disclosure bar. The False Claims Act (“FCA”) is the government’s primary weapon against waste, fraud, and abuse in government contracting.  Penalties for FCA violations are harsh: actual damages are trebled, and each false … Continue Reading

D.C. Circuit Rejects “Collective Knowledge” But Shines Spotlight on Processes

By Robert M. P. Hurwitz A good internal investigation gives equal scrutiny to people and processes. It may be easier to replace or reprimand the “bad apple” employee than to overhaul a system with which employees are familiar and has become ingrained in the operational culture. Nevertheless, it is increasingly vital that companies take a hard look at … Continue Reading

Could You Be The “Beneficiary” Of The “Inadvertent” Submission Of A False Claim?

By Charles L. Kreindler and Barbara E. Taylor Are you a parent corporation with a subsidiary that does business with a state or local government? Are you a manufacturer or supplier whose products end up down the distribution chain with a state or local government? If so, you could be the “beneficiary” of a false claim and … Continue Reading

Size Does Matter – Impacts Of The Small Business Jobs Act Of 2010

By David S. Gallacher On September 27, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 (Pub. L. No. 111-240). The Act is intended to free up capital by providing tax cuts for small businesses (some of which are temporary) and to promote exports of U.S. products, all with a … Continue Reading

Implied False Certification Theory Gains Support In Ninth Circuit

By Robert M.P. Hurwitz Last month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit extended the breadth of the False Claims Act for actions brought within that Circuit by accepting the implied false certification theory of liability. This is a significant development that increases the risk of doing business with the government and enhances the … Continue Reading

Amendments To New York State False Claims Act Encourage Qui Tam Actions

By Anthony N. Moshirnia On August 13, 2010, effective August 27, 2010, the New York legislature enacted Chapter 379, turbo-charging the New York False Claims Act (“FCA”), N.Y. State Fin. Law § 187 et seq., and providing would-be whistleblowers with powerful new incentives to file qui tam actions. The revised New York FCA generally adopts the provisions … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Weakens Rule 9(b) In False Claims Act Litigation

By Robert M.P. Hurwitz The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently weakened the impact of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 9(b) in False Claims Act (“FCA”) cases. The FCA allows whistleblowers (called “relators”) to bring lawsuits against contractors on behalf of the federal government. Relators can receive up to 30 percent of the government’s … Continue Reading

Meanwhile, Sixth Circuit Remains Firm On Rule 9(b) In False Claims Act Litigation

By Christopher E. Hale This article continues discussion of Rule 9(b) in False Claims Act litigation from Ninth Circuit Weakens Rule 9(b) in False Claims Act Litigation, also published today. While the Ninth Circuit has joined the minority position on fraudulent scheme complaints, the Sixth Circuit has reiterated the standard adopted in Bledsoe II, requiring … Continue Reading

Finally, A Ruling That Applies Some Common Sense To The False Claims Act

By Jonathan S. Aronie and Christopher M. Loveland Search for the phrase False Claims Act on the Internet, and you will be hit with a barrage of websites telling you how easy it is to bring a fraud case against a Government contractor. Sadly, these websites are right. The bar to bringing FCA claims has been lowered to … Continue Reading

The Supreme Court Signals It Will Resolve FCA Original Source and Rule 9(b) Issues

Where is the line between a legitimate False Claims Act whistleblower and an opportunistic parasite? How detailed do a whistleblower’s allegations have to be to survive a motion to dismiss and subject a defendant to expensive discovery? These questions have split the federal courts. The Supreme Court recently invited the Solicitor General to offer the government’s opinions on … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Decision Emphasizes the Importance of a Well-Crafted FCA Settlement Agreement

With its recent decision in Cell Therapeutics Inc. v. Lash Group Inc., 9th Cir., No. 08-35619, Nov. 18, 2009, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit took a dramatic step towards preserving the rights of False Claims Act (FCA) defendants. The court’s ruling permits FCA qui tam defendants to seek recovery against third … Continue Reading

You Want a Piece of Stimulus Spending? How Much Risk Are You Willing to Accept?

Stimulus projects are likely to come with a thick string of transparency and accountability requirements, along with potentially severe financial penalties and, in some cases, possible prison time. These conditions may be extended not only to U.S. government contractors, but to companies undertaking federally funded projects for state and local governments. Companies that plan to … Continue Reading

New FCA Materiality Definition Enters Time Warp, Influences Interpretation of 1986 Statute

The civil False Claims Act (FCA) prohibits using false statements related to a false claim. (Other types of FCA liability include presenting a false claim, concealing an obligation to pay money to the government, and conspiring to violate the FCA.) In the recent FCA amendments, Congress explicitly added materiality as an element of FCA false statement liability. … Continue Reading

Federal Court Limits Retroactive Application of FCA Amendments

Congress recently expanded contractors’ liability under the civil False Claims Act (FCA). The substantive changes include eliminating the presentment requirement, adding liability for claims seeking non-United States funds, expanding the scope of reverse false claims and conspiracy liability, and eliminating the intent requirement for conspiring to violate the FCA and for using false statements material to … Continue Reading

New FCA Rules Put Lenders and Brokers Directly in Their Gun Sights

I.  INTRODUCTION Without a doubt, the False Claims Act ("FCA") has been dramatically changed in the last few months. As will be discussed in more detail herein, it certainly appears that the FCA has been retooled so that the playing field is now stacked in favor of the government and qui tam plaintiffs. There is also every … Continue Reading

Working Like a Highway Road Crew — Government Finally Amends SF 1443 to Eliminate References to “Paid Cost Rule,” a Mere Seven Years After the Fact

In November 2002, the FAR Councils eliminated the so-called "paid cost" rule from the FAR, which had previously prevented federal prime contractors other than small businesses from recognizing incurred subcontractor costs for purposes of progress billing until "payment by cash, check, or other form of actual payment" had actually been made. See 67 Federal Register 70520 … Continue Reading
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